Không gì là không thể lại không thể nhắc đến sự thật về Việt Nam

This is a Vietnamese translation of my 29 April 2022 article entitled “Nothing is Impossible” Finds It Impossible to Tell the Truth About Vietnam that originally appeared in CounterPunch. Translation by Nhã Uyên. (Cảm ơn đồng chí!) Shalom (שלום), MAA Ngay trước Tết Nguyên đán, tôi cuối cùng đã nhận được bản đánh giá của mình … Continue reading Không gì là không thể lại không thể nhắc đến sự thật về Việt Nam

“And where there is sadness, joy” by Kent Nerburn

The image is linked to the book on Amazon.com This is a story written by US writer Kent Nerburn that went viral as The Last Cab Ride. Originally entitled The Cab Ride I'll Never Forget, it appeared in his 1999 book, Make Me An Instrument of Your Peace. I reprint it here because I want … Continue reading “And where there is sadness, joy” by Kent Nerburn

“Nothing is Impossible” Finds It Impossible to Tell the Truth About Vietnam

Here's my latest for CounterPunch. Thanks to Rutgers University Press for the review copy. Better late than never. Here are some excerpts, including the two paragraphs followed by a section entitled The Measure of the Man. Enjoy (or not)! Just before the Lunar New Year, I finally received my review copy of Nothing is Impossible: America’s … Continue reading “Nothing is Impossible” Finds It Impossible to Tell the Truth About Vietnam

Mixing Historical Apples & Oranges

The book I'm currently reading. If you haven't heard of Kent Nerburn and you're interested in US history and various Native American tribes that have been victimized and marginalized by said history, I recommend that you to look him up. I follow him on Facebook (I'm an author who works in the fields of spirituality … Continue reading Mixing Historical Apples & Oranges

The Transition & Continuation of Thích Nhất Hạnh

Look into a plum tree. In each plum on the tree there is a pit. That pit contains the plum tree and all previous generations of plum tree. The plum pit contains an eternity of plum trees. Inside the pit is an intelligence and wisdom that knows how to become a plum tree, how to … Continue reading The Transition & Continuation of Thích Nhất Hạnh

An Excerpt from “Then The Americans Came”

Then The Americans Came: Voices from Vietnam is a 1994 book written by Martha Hess that consists of over 100 interviews conducted by the author in Viet Nam during 1990-91 involving atrocities committed by US forces above and below the 17th parallel. The eyewitness report below is about Khâm Thiên Street in the Đống Đa … Continue reading An Excerpt from “Then The Americans Came”

Human Resource Development in Vietnam: Research and Practice

I'm happy to have played a small role in this worthwhile project. This book, which is part of the Palgrave Macmillan Asian Business Series, will be available in January 2021. If you check out the listing on Amazon, you'll see that - at $149.99 - it is primarily for institutional libraries, unless you have deep … Continue reading Human Resource Development in Vietnam: Research and Practice

Anti-Vietnam Bias in “The New York Review of Books”

Most Americans -- even relatively sophisticated ones who read The New York Review of Books -- have little knowledge of Third World countries. There is a real need for books written by sensitive and insightful journalists about countries such as Vietnam. Sadly, what we get instead is the polemical tract Vietnam: Rising Dragon written by an ideologue with a … Continue reading Anti-Vietnam Bias in “The New York Review of Books”

"Medicine Old and New" by Wilfred Burchett

Hoan Kiem Lake in Hanoi in 1966. Screenshot from documentary "Vietnam North." Below is chapter six in its entirety from a 1966 book entitled Vietnam North: A First-Hand Report by prominent Australian journalist Wilfred Burchett. In it he wrote about the ingenuity of Vietnamese medical professionals in successfully confronting difficult medical and surgical issues created … Continue reading "Medicine Old and New" by Wilfred Burchett

Last Night I Dreamed of Peace: The Diary of Đặng Thùy Trâm

July 25, 1968: Oh, my God. How hateful the war is. And the more hate, the more the devils are eager to fight. Why do they enjoy shooting and killing good people like us? How can they have the heart to kill all those youngsters who love life, who are struggling and living for so … Continue reading Last Night I Dreamed of Peace: The Diary of Đặng Thùy Trâm