Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam

This post is quite obviously NOT about education or US-Vietnam educational exchange.  It's about history, its impact on the present, and the United States' (in)ability to overcome its past.  The German word that describes this process, Vergangenheitsbewältigung, implies dealing with, learning from, but also overcoming the past.  It's about a horrible truth that Nick Turse tells his fellow citizens and the world about … Continue reading Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam

Talking Nationalism, Patriotism and Global Citizenship with US Students in Vietnam

Last month, I was invited by a colleague from Augustana College (Illinois) to meet with a group of her students who were in Vietnam on a short-term study abroad program.  The students had spent five weeks at Augustana, followed by another five weeks in southern, central and northern Vietnam.  The website describes the program as follows:  Vietnam is … Continue reading Talking Nationalism, Patriotism and Global Citizenship with US Students in Vietnam

Good Question, Vietnam!

I'm resurrecting a unique people-to-people diplomacy project that I've had on the back burner for a few years.   It gives Vietnamese, mostly but not exclusively young people, the opportunity to ask questions about any aspect of U.S. society and culture that interests them.  I then identify  U.S. colleagues and others (e.g., Vietnamese who have studied in the US for at … Continue reading Good Question, Vietnam!

Education in Vietnam

Below is information about a new book, edited by Jonathan D. London and published by the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies in Singapore.   Dr. London is an Assistant Professor (Sociology) in the Department of Asian & International Studies at the City University of Hong Kong.  Vietnam is a country on the move. Yet, contemporary Vietnam’s education system … Continue reading Education in Vietnam

Science Education Across Borders: Why Academic Globalization Should Be Welcomed, Not Feared

From the conclusion of this essay, excerpted from a forthcoming book The Great Brain Race: How Global Universities are Reshaping the World by Ben Wildavsky. The United States should respond to the globalization of higher education not with angst but with a sense of possibility. Neither a gradual erosion in the U.S. market share of students … Continue reading Science Education Across Borders: Why Academic Globalization Should Be Welcomed, Not Feared