“Review” of Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam

Haunting.  This is the title of a "review" I recently posted on Amazon about Kill Anything That Moves:  The Real American War in Vietnam by Nick Turse, which is available in paperback today.  Actually, it's not so much a review as it is a rebuttal to every criticism - or at least all of the ones … Continue reading “Review” of Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam

Du học không khó (Study Abroad is Not Difficult)

This is the matter-of-fact title of a new book written by Trần Ngọc Thịnh, who earned a Master’s degree in 2011 from the Harry S. Truman School of Public Affairs at the University of Missouri with the support of a Fulbright scholarship. Du học không khó is a unique A-Z Vietnamese language resource that's chock-full of … Continue reading Du học không khó (Study Abroad is Not Difficult)

It’s Hard To Find Good Help These Days…

A.K.A. Skilling Up Vietnam: Preparing The Workforce for A Modern Market Economy This is a chronic problem that receives ongoing and extensive coverage in the media here.  Follow these links to read a recent article about this World Bank report and download all 138 pp. of it.  Below is an infographic that pretty much sums it up.

98% of Vietnamese Students Prefer English!

According to the Ministry of Education and Training (MoET), 98% of all students want to learn English.  While I knew that English was the most popular foreign language, I didn't realize it was THAT popular.  This popularity, however, is a double-edged sword.  While it makes it easier to focus resources on one area, it is exceedingly … Continue reading 98% of Vietnamese Students Prefer English!

“In Return to Vietnam, Vets Tackle Mess They Left Behind”

Some excerpts from this 2 December 2013 Newsweek magazine article written by Jeff Stein: It’s not easy to find a turkey dinner in Hanoi, but a handful of Americans and their Vietnamese friends gathered last Thursday over an imported bird cooked for them at a fancy restaurant in the capital’s old quarter, and they gave thanks. … Continue reading “In Return to Vietnam, Vets Tackle Mess They Left Behind”

Education Companies in Vietnam: Take a Walk on the Wild Side (Part II)

Note:  Follow this link to read the first post in this two-part series. Due Diligence Some advice to my foreign higher education colleagues:  don't trust any of the come-ons or be seduced by the slick lines in (sometimes) passable English that arrive in your inboxes on a regular basis.  Do your homework, check references, and find out who's really behind … Continue reading Education Companies in Vietnam: Take a Walk on the Wild Side (Part II)

Businesses criticize universities’ training quality

Tell us something we don't know.  This is a perennial issue that should be addressed sooner rather than later.  I can attest to the results of this survey as an observer of the education scene here and an employer in two different sectors.  (The bold in the article excerpt is mine.)  Keep in mind that this survey is specific to … Continue reading Businesses criticize universities’ training quality

Education Companies in Vietnam: Take a Walk on the Wild Side (Part I)

In Vietnam, where cheating is a national pastime and ethical business practices are in dangerously short supply, the world of educational consulting is no exception.  EducationUSA fantasies notwithstanding, the reality is that most parents and students work with an education agent instead of applying directly to U.S. (and other foreign) colleges and universities, as in other … Continue reading Education Companies in Vietnam: Take a Walk on the Wild Side (Part I)

At 30,000 Feet All I See Are Alumni

Below is a guest post from Marguerite Dennis, who has been recruiting internationally for over 25 years, first at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. and then at Suffolk University in Boston, Massachusetts.  Those colleges and universities that have dedicated and active alumni certainly have a competitive advantage over those that don't in terms of student recruitment and exploring … Continue reading At 30,000 Feet All I See Are Alumni