“Review” of Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam

Haunting.  This is the title of a "review" I recently posted on Amazon about Kill Anything That Moves:  The Real American War in Vietnam by Nick Turse, which is available in paperback today.  Actually, it's not so much a review as it is a rebuttal to every criticism - or at least all of the ones … Continue reading “Review” of Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam

“In Return to Vietnam, Vets Tackle Mess They Left Behind”

Some excerpts from this 2 December 2013 Newsweek magazine article written by Jeff Stein: It’s not easy to find a turkey dinner in Hanoi, but a handful of Americans and their Vietnamese friends gathered last Thursday over an imported bird cooked for them at a fancy restaurant in the capital’s old quarter, and they gave thanks. … Continue reading “In Return to Vietnam, Vets Tackle Mess They Left Behind”

Vietnam Ranks 9th in… Remittances

According to the World Bank (PDF), officially recorded remittances to developing countries were estimated at $401 billion in 2012, and remain a key resource flow far exceeding official development assistance as well as private debt and portfolio equity.  Growth in remittances to developing countries decelerated to 5.3 percent in 2012, but is expected to accelerate to 8.8 percent … Continue reading Vietnam Ranks 9th in… Remittances

“From the Lion’s Den: An Open Letter (and Invitation) to Vietnam Veterans”

What America owes Vietnam it can never repay, though there are many Americans in the U.S. and Vietnam today, including veterans, who are striving mightily and in myriad ways to contribute to the physical and spiritual healing process.  The "Nam," as some of you still think of it, this country of your dreams and your … Continue reading “From the Lion’s Den: An Open Letter (and Invitation) to Vietnam Veterans”

The Rushford Report on the “Consul General’s Candidacy as the Next Ambassador to Vietnam”

This blog post from Diplopundit and the 15 April 2013 article on which it’s based, entitled “How (Not) to Become a U.S. Ambassador” by Greg Rushford of The Rushford Report fame, definitely fall into the category of Intrigue.

Diplopundit

On April 15, Greg Rushford of The Rushford Report published this piece on How (Not) to Become a U.S. Ambassador.  The article refers to the U.S. Consul General in Ho Chi Minh City, career Foreign Service officer An T. Le. Our U.S. Ambassador to Vietnam is David Shear who arrived at post in August 2011. Under typical appointments,  Ambassador Shear, as a career diplomat appointed to his position by President Obama, is expected to serve until the summer of 2014.

The reporter is citing email exchange concerning this “candidacy” —  this might be the first time a career FSO is shown as allegedly conducting in Rushford’s words “essentially a clandestine political pressure campaign aimed [at] securing a White House nomination.”  If you want to look at this kindly, one might say, the FSO demonstrates long term preparation and foresight for a vacancy that is expected to occur in 15…

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“The 50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War: Revising the Past, Revisiting the Lies”

This piece about the US commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War was published in The Huffington Post blog on 9 April 2013.  I introduced it with this excerpt from a 2003 essay written by war veteran Steve Banko: One of our victims was searched when the shooting stopped and the bleeding continued and was … Continue reading “The 50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War: Revising the Past, Revisiting the Lies”

The Double-Edged Sword That Is US Higher Education

I was recently invited by Madame Ton Nu Thi Ninh, President of the Tri Viet Institute for International Studies and Exchange within Ton Duc Thang University and Senior Advisor to the President of TDT  University, to speak to interested students, faculty and staff about US higher education in comparative perspective with an implicit focus on Vietnam.  As with people, every … Continue reading The Double-Edged Sword That Is US Higher Education

Calling a Spade a Spade: Stanley Karnow, Stanley McChrystal & Vietnam

Below is a recent exchange on the Vietnam Studies Group (VSG) listserv.  Members include Vietnam scholars and practitioners, current and former diplomats and spooks ("agents or people involved in espionage"), journalists, non-governmental (NGO) organization staff, etc.  Quite a few are overseas Vietnamese (Việt kiều).  Read from the bottom up.  Bernard Kalb, the journalist and former US State Department spokesman during … Continue reading Calling a Spade a Spade: Stanley Karnow, Stanley McChrystal & Vietnam

Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam

This post is quite obviously NOT about education or US-Vietnam educational exchange.  It's about history, its impact on the present, and the United States' (in)ability to overcome its past.  The German word that describes this process, Vergangenheitsbewältigung, implies dealing with, learning from, but also overcoming the past.  It's about a horrible truth that Nick Turse tells his fellow citizens and the world about … Continue reading Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam

Capstone VN Selected to Participate in Professional Exchange Program

Capstone Vietnam, of which I'm managing director, has been selected to participate in a program entitled Vietnam and USA mid-level professionals exchange program: Mutual learning for economic empowerment in the context of business and government partnerships. Portland State University (PSU) was awarded a 2-year, $400.000 grant by the Professional Fellows Division of the Education and … Continue reading Capstone VN Selected to Participate in Professional Exchange Program