In Memoriam – Dennis Berg


Dennis F. Berg, professor emeritus of sociology whose international travels helped Cal State Fullerton establish global connections in Vietnam and China, died Jan. 19.
dennis-berg-fb-pic
Dennis Berg Facebook Profile Photo

This is a sad time indeed for those of us who knew Dennis Berg, who divided his time between Ho Chi Minh City/Saigon and southern California.  I was shocked to learn of Den’s tragic death via a Facebook post by one of his sons, Jeff:

Yesterday the world lost a great man, my Father, Dennis Berg. With great joy he helped so many, including myself, become the best version of themselves that they could become. He will be greatly missed. Love you Dad!

Follow this link to read the California State University, Fullerton announcement in its entirety.

It was my privilege to know Den as a friend and a colleague.  He was a kind, warm-hearted, and gentle man who cared deeply about both countries and who touched generations of students and colleagues through his teaching, research, training, and mentorship. I, along with many others here and around the world, will miss him.

Here’s part of an email signature he once used, which tells you something about Dennis Berg and how he lived his life:

“Dance as if no one’s watching,
sing as if no one’s listening,
and live every day as if it were your last.”
—— Irish proverb.
“and tell those you love and care about
that you do every chance you get.”
——- Dennis proverb.

My heartfelt condolences to his wife, Hong Hoa, his sons, Jeff and Jason, and the entire Berg family in Viet Nam and the US.

MAA

The key question to keep asking is, ‘Are you spending your time on the right things?’ Because time is all you have.  (Randy Pausch, 1960-2008)

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One thought on “In Memoriam – Dennis Berg

  1. A decade ago, I decided to study the community college system in Viet Nam making my first trip. Mark Ashwell, who was a tremendous help to my research, introduced me to Dennis. As I traveled the country during my research gathering phase, Dennis treated me like a long lost friend, inviting me to his classroom, lending me an unlocked cell phone, teaching me how to survive in country, etc He had never met me before. His generosity to a complete stranger is beyond the stories I could tell. He was a colleague who lived the meaning of the word.

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